Skip to Content

History

Timeline of bibic history

2016

bibic expanded the therapy team by recruiting four new therapists. With each therapist on a 6-month training programme, all four therapists will be seeing families by late 2017.


2014

bibic moved to new premises in Langport where it is based today.


2007

The British Institute for Brain Injured Children shortened it’s name and became known as bibic.


1990s

After over 20 years building an amazing charity, Keith Pennock retired as Chief Executive of bibic.


 

1980

Some differences in opinion regarding methodology, and the natural independence from Philadelphia that grew over time, led to the independence of The British Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential becoming The British Institute for Brain Injured Children.


1976

Keith moved The British Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential to Knowle Hall in Bridgwater, Somerset.


1972

After huge improvements in Alison’s difficulties and great success with the programme Keith, was approached by The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential and opened The British Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential in Staffordshire.


1970

Keith and his wife heard about The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential and travelled to Philadelphia with Alison to use the services of The Rehabilitation Centre.


1966

Meanwhile, in England, Keith Pennock’s daughter Alison is born. She developed brain damage after a reaction to a vaccination.


1963

After growth in the number of families using it, and the diversification of the doctors and therapists working there, The Rehabilitation Centre at Philadelphia became the main centre for The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential.


1955

The Rehabilitation Centre at Philadelphia was founded by Dr Fay, allowing him to deliver on a larger scale the ideas he had first discovered at the Neurophysical Rehabilitation Centre.


1930s-40s

Dr Temple Fay, a neurosurgeon and professor of neurology, founded the Neurophysical Rehabilitation Centre in the USA. This centre for families created easy access to services offering therapeutic methods to encourage functional improvement in children by providing new stimuli to whichever area of the brain was struggling. This is how the principal of sensory and motor stimulation became established.

Our Corporate Supporters

Back to top